6.29.2012

A Quick Way to Recognize Lower or Higher Notes on the Fretboard



If at any time you're playing a single note, it can be helpful to know where the lower or higher version of that note is located. 
Acoustic Guitar Headstock and Amp Burnt Photo
Image Courtesy of Boboroshi

Here's an easy way to remember it.

If you're playing a note on either of the first two strings (the low E and A assuming a standard tuning), there's a quick way to tell where the higher octave version of the note you're playing is located. 

Likewise, if you're playing a note on the 3rd or 4th strings (the D and G assuming a standard tuning), there's a quick way to tell where the lower octave version of the note is located.

An octave higher will be two frets up and two strings up - Hence if you're playing a low G, first string, 3rd fret, a high G will be located two frets up and two strings up, therefore on the fifth fret and third string.

In this case, both notes are G.
 
E|--------
B|--------
G|--------
D|-----5--
A|--------
E|--3-----

An octave lower will simple be the opposite of this -- Take for example if you were playing an A on the third string, 7th fret. The lower A will be two frets down and two strings lower.

In this case, both notes are A

E|--------
B|--------
G|--------
D|--7-----
A|--------
E|-----5--


This of course applies anywhere on the fret board if you are playing the lower note on the first two strings (looking to go up), or the higher note on the 3rd of 4th strings (looking to go down). 

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About Robert Kittleberger

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